Batten’s South Somerset Villages by John Batten

Batten’s South Somerset Villages by John Batten lands on the shelves of my shop.

Tiverton: Somerset Books, 1994, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Genealogical Tables; Chapter Headpieces;

From the cover: Battens South Somerset Villages was first published in 1894 as Historical and Topographical Collections relating to the Early History of Parts of South Somerset

It charts the history of ten South Somerset villages Barwick, Chilton Cantelo, Sutton Bingham, East Coker, Brympton, Houndstone, Preston Plucknett, Limington, West Coker and Hardington Mandeville from the Domesday Survey (1086). This fascinating facsimile edition (including rare early photographs) will make compelling reading for all those who live in, or appreciate from a distance, this beautiful part of Wessex. It examines in detail the families, lands, houses and churches around which have been constructed a thousand years of history, and which have left their legacy in present-day South Somerset.

Battens original text is complemented by a completely new introduction by Robin Ansell, outlining the authors local back-ground and historical writings.

Very Good in Very Good Dust Wrapper.

Grey boards with Gilt titling to the Spine. 199 pages. Index. 9″ x 5¾”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one there are plenty more available here!

Unheralded Victory: Who Won the Vietnam War? by Mark W. Woodruff

Unheralded Victory: Who Won the Vietnam War? by Mark W. Woodruff lands on the shelves of my shop.

London: HarperCollinsPublishers, 2000, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Maps;

From the cover: Unheralded Victory is a revisionist history of the Vietnam war based on personal experience and exhaustive study of what actually happened, as opposed to what was reported. Contrary to what might be expected, it charts the defeat of the Viet Cong. It investigates why the popular image of the war then, as now, is that propagated by Hanois propaganda machine, and why US propaganda was so clumsy. Many myths are debunked: drug use among US forces, fragging; American morale: the authors account squares with the recollections of actual veterans. He also exposes a number of eyewitnesses, some active in the veterans organizations who were never in Vietnam and whose false testimony has contributed to enduring myth of the crazed Vietnam veteran as portrayed in cinema and TV. An original military history, Unheralded Victory echoes some themes revisited in NATOs war on Serbia: how what gets reported can be more important than the events on the ground especially if the frontline is a very dangerous place for film crew.

Introduction by: James L. Jones

Very Good in Very Good Dust Wrapper. Leans slightly. Pages very gently age-tanned.

Black boards with Gilt titling to the Spine. [XIV] 338 pages. Index. Bibliography. 9½” x 6¼”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one there are plenty more available here!

Ten Days to D-Day: Countdown to the Liberation of Europe by David Stafford

Ten Days to D-Day: Countdown to the Liberation of Europe by David Stafford lands on the shelves of my shop.

Little, Brown, 2003, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Maps;

From the cover: It was the day that changed the course of a war, and also a century. Meticulous in their planning, brilliant in their execution, the landings of 6 June 1944 constitute the largest seaborne assault ever attempted. As dawn rose, and the first of the 150,000 Allied troops reached the Normandy beaches, D-Day heralded the beginning of the end of the Second World War.

In this brilliantly readable account, acclaimed historian David Stafford describes the countdown to the Normandy landings from a multitude of angles, from the perspectives of Churchill and Eisenhower to those of the ordinary people whose courage and dedication made it all possible.

Written with the pace of a thriller, Ten Days to D-Day switches from country to country, from character to character: the English Wren working on coded signals; the French Resistance worker and his clandestine network; the Norwegian freedom fighter imprisoned in a Gestapo cell; the American paratrooper waiting for action; the Jew hiding in a Paris garret; the German soldier on the French coast who is convinced that invasion is a long way off; the Canadian rifleman due to land in the first assault wave. Stafford chronicles the actions of Churchill, Hitler, Rommel, Eisenhower and de Gaulle in these crucial days and shows the vital work of the deception agents who fed false information to the Nazi hierarchy.

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Researched from contemporary letters, diaries and official records, Ten Days to D-Day is history as it happened, a book that brings these tumultuous events brilliantly to life. It is a story of nations but, above all, it is an account of the lives of individual men and women on the brink of an epic moment in history.

Very Good in Very Good Dust Wrapper. Dust wrapper very slightly rubbed at the edges. Pages lightly age-tanned, more heavily so at the margins.

Navy Blue boards with Gilt titling to the Spine. [XV] 366 pages. Index. Bibliography. 9½” x 6¼”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one there are plenty more available here!

Great Battle Fleets by Oliver Warner

Great Battle Fleets by Oliver Warner lands on the shelves of my shop.

London, New York, Sydney, Totonto: Hamlyn, 1973, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Facsimiles; Colour Plates; Black & White Plates; Illustrated endpapers and blanks;

From the cover: The era of the battle fleet is over. Never again will mighty surface fleets clash on the high seas. From the sixteenth century to the Second World War, when battle fleets faced each other, the fate of nations hung in the balance. The westward thrust of Islam was checked by the Spanish and Venetians at Lepanto in 1571; the United States owes her emergence as a nation in part to the action of the French fleet off Chesapeake Bay in 1781; in 1942 at Midway the fate of Japan was sealed in a titanic struggle between the two most powerful fleets ever to oppose each other.

In this book the distinguished naval historian Oliver Warner tells the stories of the Spanish, Elizabethan, Dutch and Swedish fleets, of the fleet of France and Nelsons fleet, of the Imperial Japanese fleet, the British Grand Fleet, the German High Seas Fleet and the United States fleet. He describes each at its zenith, detailing also its origins and later history. He tells of the commanders, the fighting men, the engagements and above all of the ships themselves: the Venetian galleasses, Nelsons ships of the line, the early ironclads and the revolutionary Dreadnoughts.

The wide range of illustrations in colour and black-and-white capture the drama and heroics of the battles and the majesty of the great ships and fleets at sea. Together, text and pictures combine to make this an important and highly attractive book, presenting as it does a broad view of the distribution of sea power over the last five hundred years.

Very Good in Good Dust Wrapper. Dust wrapper a little faded at the spine and somewhat dull overall. Text complete, clean and tight. Price Clipped.

240 pages. Index. Bibliography. 12″ x 9″.

Of course, if you don’t like this one there are plenty more available here!

The Wreckers: A Story of Killing Seas, False Lights and Plundered Ships by Bella Bathurst

The Wreckers: A Story of Killing Seas, False Lights and Plundered Ships by Bella Bathurst lands on the shelves of my shop.

HarperCollins, 2005, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Maps;

From the cover: A fine shipwreck has always represented sport, pleasure, treasure, and in many cases the difference between living well and just getting by. Though it is the Cornish who became most notorious for wrecking, coastal communities throughout Britain regarded the seas bounty as an impromptu way of providing themselves with everything from grapefruits to grand pianos. Some plunderers were supposed to be so skilled that they could strip a ship from stem to stern before the Coastguard had left port, some were supposed to lure ships onto the rocks with false lights, some simply waited for winter gales to do their work. For a fully-laden general cargo vessel to run aground in an accessible position is more or less like having Selfridges crash-land in your back garden, writes Bella Bathurst, a Selfridges with all the prices removed.

From all around Britain, Bathurst has uncovered the secret history of ships and shipwreck victims, from shoreline orgies so Dionysian that few participants survived until morning to crofts fitted with silver candelabra, and from coastlines rigged like stage sets to the strange tale of Britains Royal Fish. Spanning three hundred years of history, The Wreckers examines the myths, realities, and superstitions of shipwrecks, and uncovers the darker side of life on our island shores.

Very Good in Very Good Dust Wrapper. Leans slightly otherwise a very well presented copy.

Blue boards with Gilt titling to the Spine. [XXIV] 326 pages. Index. Bibliography. 8¾” x 5¾”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one there are plenty more available here!

The Boer War by Tabitha Jackson

The Boer War by Tabitha Jackson lands on the shelves of my shop.

London: Channel 4 Books , 1999, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Facsimiles; Maps;

From the cover: The BOER WAR (1899-1902) shaped the destiny of South Africa and, as Rudyard Kipling remarked, taught the mighty British Empire no end of a lesson.

It was said to be the last of the gentlemans wars, a white mans war and it would be over by Christmas. It was none of these things. The Boer War was brutal, racially explosive, and it took the greatest empire in the world nearly three years to beat a Boer army smaller than the population of Brighton.

The Boer War catapulted the world into the twentieth century, prefiguring the worst excesses of modern conflicts: the indiscriminate bombing of civilians, scorched earth, rape, concentration camps. It was also a civil war, dividing families, communities, and races.

Startling new material reveals the involvement of blacks on both sides fighting at the front and dying in a network of black-only concentration camps. Black support and participation were rewarded with broken promises and betrayal; the peace settlement endorsed white supremacy in South Africa.

The combination of new research, powerful oral testimony, and a wealth of recently discovered letters and diaries makes The Boer War, and the Channel 4 series made by Twenty Twenty Television that it accompanies, an important reassessment. Illustrated throughout with many previously unseen photographs, The Boer War is a unique history of a much misunderstood conflict that has cast a long shadow across the century.

Very Good in Very Good Dust Wrapper. A little rubbing to the edges of the dust wrapper.

Grey boards with Silver titling to the Spine. 192 pages. Index. Bibliography. 10″ x 7¾”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one there are plenty more available here!

Aircraft of the Cold War: 1945-1991 by Thomas Newdick

Aircraft of the Cold War: 1945-1991 by Thomas Newdick lands on the shelves of my shop.

London: Amber Books, 2010, Hardback in dust wrapper.

Illustrated by way of: Black & White Photographs; Colour Drawings; Tables; Illustrated endpapers and blanks;

From the cover: Illustrated with detailed artworks of combat aircraft and their markings, The Essential Aircraft Identification Guide: Aircraft of the Cold War is a comprehensive study of the planes in service with NATO and the Warsaw Pact and their respective units from the end of World War II until the reunification of Germany. Arranged chronologically within each theatre, the book gives a complete organisational breakdown of the units of both sides, including the units and aircraft used in the proxy wars fought in Korea, Vietnam, the Middle East and elsewhere, as well as the front line in Germany. Each section includes a compact history of the role and impact of aircraft on the course of the Cold War, as well as orders of battle and lists of commanders and aces.

The Essential Aircraft Identification Guide: Aircraft of the Cold War features a wide range of aircraft types, including the numerous variants of well-known models, such as the MiG-15, the McDonnell Douglas F-15 and the Harrier, through to lesser-known aircraft such as the Lockheed P-80 and the Yak-28. Each aircraft profile is accompanied by exhaustive specifications, as well as details of individual and unit markings.

Packed with 250 colour profiles of every major type of combat aircraft from the era, The Essential Aircraft Identification Guide: Aircraft of the Cold War is an essential reference guide for modellers, military historians and aircraft enthusiasts.

In the Essential Aircraft Identification Guide series.

Very Good in Good+ Dust Wrapper. A little rubbing to the edges of the dust wrapper with a small nick to the head of the spine. Text complete, clean and tight.

Matching Pictorial boards. 192 pages. Index. 9¾” x 7¾”.

Of course, if you don’t like this one there are plenty more available here!